Books by Lorie Ann Grover

Books by Lorie Ann Grover
Kirkus Starred Review, Firstborn: "A fantasy that reads like a lost history tome and deftly examines issues of gender...An engrossing story with welcome depths."

Monday, December 9, 2019

Figure Drawing at Tacoma Art Museum

After thirty-four years, I was able to return to the studio for a figure drawing session. I believe the following drawings were ten and twenty minute sessions. What a delight to return to this setting. The Tacoma Art Museum hosts these monthly events for local artists. I'm hoping to attend again soon! 






Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Happy Book Birthday: I Love All of Me


  • Today! She's born! Celebrations!

Happy book birthday to I Love All of Me! Thank you for sharing the joy in this virtual launch party. Feel free to spread the word. May she be held by many tiny hands who know they are worthy, wonderful, and welcome in our world. Huzzah!

SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL
Best Board Book of the Season

From “wiggle toes” and “smelly nose” to “blinky eyes” and “bendy knees,” this is a delightful, affirming ode to toddler parts. The smile-inducing rhymes beg to be repeated again and again, while the bold palette and cheery images heighten the book’s enthusiastic tone. 
SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL

Grover’s rhyming text soars, and reading the words aloud almost feels like singing a song...a vibrant and lyrical ode to bodies ideal for those learning to explore their own. 
KIRKUS REVIEWS

Grover’s book gets right to the point in an unfussy and streamlined way; it’s a breath of fresh air and just right for sharing with the toddlers in your life....With a book like Grover’s at the ready, that grownup can say to a child: I love you just the way you are, and I want you to do the same. What a powerful and compassionate sentiment.
KIRKUS REVIEWSJulie Danielson

I Love All of Me
by Lorie Ann Grover
Cartwheel Books, Scholastic, September 17, 2019

Sunday, September 8, 2019

The Language of Fire: Stephanie Hemphill


Celebrations for Stephanie Hemphill and her recent work The Language of Fire! The Printz Honor Winner has reimagined the life of Joan of Arc for today's reader. In lyrical verse, we follow the young, illiterate peasant as she leads an army to victory at the cost of her life. With an infectious bravery, single-mindedness, and passion, here is an example for all.

"The only sound
piercing the smoky air
is the scream of a girl
named Jehanne.
But
I became so much more."

Hemphill's words resonate as they bring Joan's truth forward:

"One life is all we have
and we live it
as we believe in living it
that to sacrifice what you are
and to live without belief
that is a fate more terrible
than dying." 

In the concluding Author's Note, we are called.

"This generation has embraced and championed awareness. Joan found a way to action. Combine awareness and action without repercussion and there is not only forward movement, but a tectonic shift." 

May it be so.

Finishing this treasure, I was completely surprised and honored to find my name in the acknowledgements. 


Find this beauty. Share it. Let us hear our own higher purpose and march forward together. 

by Stephanie Hemphill
Balzer + Bray, 2019

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Early Buzz: I Love All of Me

Early buzz is humming for my upcoming board book which is part of my Wonderful Me series: I Love All of Me. It releases September 17th, 2019, from Cartwheel, Scholastic. Carolina Búzio's art is beautiful and full of joy!



  • So here's what's being said: 

  • SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL
Best Board Book of the Season

From “wiggle toes” and “smelly nose” to “blinky eyes” and “bendy knees,” this is a delightful, affirming ode to toddler parts. The smile-inducing rhymes beg to be repeated again and again, while the bold palette and cheery images heighten the book’s enthusiastic tone. 
SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL

Grover’s rhyming text soars, and reading the words aloud almost feels like singing a song...a vibrant and lyrical ode to bodies ideal for those learning to explore their own. 
KIRKUS REVIEWS

Grover’s book gets right to the point in an unfussy and streamlined way; it’s a breath of fresh air and just right for sharing with the toddlers in your life....With a book like Grover’s at the ready, that grownup can say to a child: I love you just the way you are, and I want you to do the same. What a powerful and compassionate sentiment.
KIRKUS REVIEWS, Julie Danielson

Pre-orders are available! Here are a couple links for you:

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Helping Each Other Forward

My collage from the former site Polyvore. 

As we collectively march forward for social justice, find our way through the gaslighting of narcissistic political leaders, and work to protect our planet, we also walk individually. In our private lives, we have encounters where we can help each other forward. The exercise requires self-knowledge, reaching deeply for compassion, and the ability to not personalize another's aggressive fears.

Sometimes in an exchange, we are the ones enlightened to a new perspective, we grow in compassion, or realize our own privilege. It is then we acknowledge that, lean in, and try again. We make ourselves vulnerable to learn and grow from another.

I found myself recently startled to learn of a particular senior's rich, life experience. The fact that I was startled unveiled an ageist bias, one I thought I didn't have. Candid, present self-awareness is required to find these and grow.

Other times, we may have opportunity to share our stories, one-to-one, to help another gain insight. These can be quick, unexpected, small moments. Despite good efforts, we may be ignored. Two instances recently occurred for me.

First, I chose to share with my dentist that his choice of music in the office might trigger survivors of sexual assault when they are caught in the chair, unable to advocate for themselves. Despite my effort to connect, the dentist, with his life experience, has chosen to continue to place his song-choice-privilege over his patients' possible pain.

In the second instance, I shared with someone that their disregard of my preference for their privilege echoed previous pain in my life. As a writer and sexual assault survivor, having my voice silenced was particularly poignant. My personal story received no compassion, and the reply quoted "real" sexual assault survivors' testimony; thereby, he avoided personal responsibility.

As we walk forward in daily life and encounter difference, we might:

1. Listen.
2. Consider the life experiences of the other person we likely know little to nothing about.
3. Ask questions.
4. Ask where the women and other marginalized groups are in the setting. What are they saying?
5. If called for, admit ignorance and work to learn.
6. If discovered, admit bias, apologize, and strive to grow past it with compassion
7. Do not compare sufferings. Each has a weight of its own.
8. Do not minimize another's sufferings, especially when they have been brave enough to share them.
9. Never take a survivor's story or testimony without permission, for your own purposes, no matter the end you are reaching for.
10. If you are powerful and privileged, do not claim you have been victimized by the marginalized.
11. Be ready to set aside your privilege out of compassion for another.

Let us grow and help each other journey well. May our self-knowledge increase; may we have the ability to not personalize others' aggressive fears; and may we be patient and compassionate as each is worthy.

Saturday, June 8, 2019

An Alert for a Misuse of My Writing

My collage from the former site, Polyvore

I offer an alert that my words were recently included in a pointed post about certain individuals and specific churches. I requested this not be done, in this manner. My request about my own words was not honored. My work was taken and my intent disregarded. When I asked for it to be removed, I was told no.

My aim in writing about former experiences regarding Tom Chantry, his prosecution, and ARBCA is to care for survivors, and encourage love and restoration where possible. Within that process, there is a naming of infractions, but it is not my position to attack or dictate a church's response. Any criminal infractions I hope will be dealt with in the courts.

I live with the belief that each one is striving to do right. We make errors. We hurt people, sometimes horrifically. And then we own those acts, carry the penalty, and work to restore. We can help each other do this.

I am sympathetic and grieve with those hurt by this man co-opting my work. Lorie Ann Grover